Thursday, February 20, 2014

Thursday, February 20, 2014

10 Effective Ways to Boost Metabolism

Every time we eat or drink, we can thank our metabolism for converting all those calories into energy. Our body size, gender, and age all factor into our metabolic rate, but there are also ways to independently increase its speed. And the faster our metabolism, the more calories our body burn off.

Here are 10 ways to keep your metabolism running high all day:

Photo credit : latesthdwallpaper.com

1. Sleep!
Our metabolism are related to our sleep, and not getting enough of it may seriously slow down our metabolism. 6 - 8 hours sleep daily are the best for adult.

Photo credit : keepcalm-o-matic.co.uk

2. Drink green tea.
Not only does this superfood pack an antioxidant-punch, researchers have found it speeds metabolism as well. Plus, it’s naturally calorie-free, so there’s no reason not to enjoy a mug (or two).

Photo credit : carlmason-liebenberg.com

3. Amp up workout intensity.
Slow and steady may not always win the race. High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT), such as interval runs, are quick intense exercises that can jumpstart metabolism and keep us burning calories longer after the workout is over.

Photo credit : www.mrwallpaper.com

4. Don’t skip breakfast.
It's the most important meal of the day and it will quick-start your metabolism for the whole day after a long rest of sleep. You should snack on something small, like a bowl of Greek yogurt even you have no AM appetite.

Photo credit : en.wikipedia.org

5. Pump some iron.
The weight room isn’t only to help bulk up or get lean. Lifting weights (heavy or light) can also help speed resting metabolic rate, making those dumbbells our new best friends. Don't worry of getting bulky.

Photo credit : weightlosswowfactor.com

6. Gulp some H2O.
Drinking enough water is a simple way to speed up digestion and burn calories. Daily intake 2 litre of water for female and 3 litre for male are recommended. So bring a water bottle with you everywhere you go.

Photo credit : blog.codyapp.com

7. Squeeze in some cardio.
45 minutes on the bike will sped up metabolic rate for over 12 hours, so get off the computer later and start cycling.

Photo credit : c3a.org.sg

8. Eat wisely.
Who knew eating could actually help speed calorie burn? Certain foods like tuna and grapefruit have been shown to speed up metabolic rate. Packing in protein has also shown to boost metabolism, so pick some eggs or oatmeal over pancakes at the breakfast table for a morning metabolism boost.

Photo credit : precisionnutrition.com

9. Grab a cup of coffee.
A cup of coffee (or the caffeine in it) is absorbed into the blood stream very quickly, speeding up heart rate and provide a metabolic boost that peaks at about three hours after drinking but don't over drink.

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10. Laugh a lot!
A little laughter may go a long way. Scientists have found that as little as 10 minutes of laughter per day can burn energy. Just another reason to stay smiling!

Any of you have some other way to boost up our metabolism? Feel free to share with us under the comment box below. Don't forget to share with your friends by sharing it.;​​​​​​​​​​​
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Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

12 highest moutain in Malaysia

Have you ever wonder what's the highest mountain in Malaysia? Or you already did visit one of these mountain? In order to make it easier for you to get an impression, we have did some research for this post which you will get to know the must-visit and must see mountain in Malaysia.


1. Gunung Kinabalu, Sabah 4095m.
Located in the Kundasang region of central Sabah, the peak is visited by more than 100,000 climbers a year. Mountain guides are compulsory and so is an overnight stay at Laban Rata, at around 3270m. Booking for the climb may be as long as 6 months ahead. While climbing can be done at anytime during the year, local weather determines the success of your climb. If it gets windy and/or a storm is predicted, climbers are not permitted to advance from Laban Rata and will have to return to base. There are two routes to Laban Rata, the more widely traveled starts from Timpohon Gate and the other the Mesilau Trail, which is 2km longer, but more gentle and scenic.

Photo credit : amazingmalaysiaa.blogspot.com

2. Gunung Trusmadi, Sabah 2642m.
Many say that Trusmadi is a much tougher climb than Mount Kinabalu. And the reason is easy to see: Mount Kinabalu has been visited (and promoted) so much that it is now very commercialized, with climbers being pampered with heated rooms, 2am buffet breakfast and opportunist souvenir peddlers. Trusmadi on the other hand, does not attract much attention and is still off the main stream tourist destination. It lies between the districts of Tambunan in the north and Keningau to the south. Nature lovers would love this trek, with the rich fauna and flora and some of the most amazing pitcher plants that dot the trail. In fact, the Nepenthes Trusmadiensis (a natural hybrid of the N. Lowii and N. Edwardsiana) is endemic to this mountain. You will need to put up a night at Base Camp 2, which can be reached in 4-5 hours from the trail head. From here, the summit is just about 1 1/2 hours away. There is a hut where you can rough it out for the night, and clear 'mountain water' is supplied via pipes and regular taps. The view of Mount Kinabalu from the peak of Trusmadi as the sun breaks at dawn is truly a sight to behold.

Photo credit : www.klhiking.com

3. Gunung Tambuyukon, Sabah 2579m.
This peak is situated at the northern end of the Croker Range. It is an even less popular mountain than Mount Trusmadi, as the locals say that only about 100 people have ascended the peak since it was opened to the public to climb in 1990. The trail head, accessible only by 4-wheeled drives, is called Kampung Manggis where the trek begins. Camp 1 is 4 hours away, and the fitter ones may want to take another 8-hour trek to Camp 2, where they can then camp for the night for the final push to the summit the following day. From Camp 2, trekkers can now make their way to the summit in 6 hours at a moderate pace.

Photo credit : lai-journeyoflife.blogspot.com

 4. Gunung Murud, Sarawak 2423m.
In the vicinity of the Tama Abu Range, surrounding the Kelabit Highlands in northeast Sarawak bordering Kalimantan, stands the sandstone mountain of Murud. The highest peak in Sarawak, it was first summited in 1922 by Swedish explorer and naturalist Dr Eric Mjoberg, who was then the curator of the Sarawak Museum. Mount Murud, according to the local Lun Bawang and Kelabit indigenous peoples, is a holy mountain. Thousands of villagers from the nearby towns of Bario and Bakalalan make their way to the Church Camp located at 1828m for their retreat annually. The pilgrimage was first inspired by the late Agong Bangau, a Lun Bawang who reportedly performed miracles and went to the mountain for meditation and prayers. There are two main trails up Mount Murud. Trekkers coming from Bario, hike northeast to Pa Lungun village and start from Long Repung Shelter (southeast of Murud). Long Repung is smack on the main trail connecting Bario and BaKelalan. The other route makes the ascend from the northeast side, starting at BaKelalan, with rest stops at Pa Rabata, Lepo Bunga and Church Camp, enroute to the Summit. Both Bario and BaKelalan are deep in the interiors of Borneo and reachable by Twin Otter planes. But if you're not up to flying, your only access to BaKelalan is a 4 -5 hour drive on 4WD through logging tracks from Lawas, which is the state's northernmost border town with Sabah, almost 350km north of Miri.

Photo credit : www.sarawaktourism.com

5. Gunung Mulu, Sarawak 2376m.
Ascends to Mount Mulu is quite rare, at times only managing 12 trips a year. After all, who would spend RM1000 for a guide to go through the mountain. Yet diehards with a mission will get the necessary number to defray the cost a little, as the guide can handle up to 10 climbers. MASwings operates flights with either Twin Otters or Fokkers between Miri and Mount Mulu. There are 3 flights in and out from each town a week - on Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays. It is possible to travel to the area by riverboat, but it requires a chartered long boat for the last part - and the whole trip takes about 12 hours from Miri, while flight time is only 30 minutes. The trek up Mount Mulu needs no tents, as there are forest huts at Camp 3 and Camp 4. The trail is quite well-marked with red and white markers, and goes through a variety of ecosystems, from lowland dipteracarp forest to montane vegetations. Depending on one's condition, the first day trek to Camp 3 could take as long as 9 hours. The huts are equipped with basic cooking utensils, you just need to bring your own food and gas cannisters. It is possible to summit on Day2, with Camp4 as base. Day3 would be the descend out to Park HQ. But it would be quite a tough deadline to meet if you want to fly out of  Mount Mulu on Day3 as well. Most people stay a night and continue to the Mulu Caves and a climb to view the famed Pinnacles the following couple of days.


Photo credit : beauty-places.com
Photo credit : en.wikipedia.org

 6. Gunung Tahan, Pahang 2187m.
Mount Tahan is the highest point in Peninsular Malaysia. It is located within the Taman Negara National Park, in the state of Pahang and is part of the Tahan Range. The Kuala Tahan classic trail is the oldest and most scenic trail. A return trip on this trail typically takes seven days and covers about 54km, one way. Climbers have to trek across undulating ridges and make several river crossings before finally reaching the base of the mountain to make the final ascend. The other two trails are Merapoh (Sungai Relau) and via Kelantan. Both are significantly shorter than the classic trail from Kuala Tahan. A return trip on the Merapoh trail takes 4 - 5 days with a trekking distance of around 32km each way, while the cross over from Kuala Tahan to Merapoh (or vice versa) takes around 7 days. The best season to climb this Grand Mountain is between April and July. While trekking, take time to observe the oldest rainforest in the world, with some estimates at over 130 million years old. It is home to thousands of endemic plants and animals. It is always a good idea to have some food buffer as there may be instances where the rivers get too swollen to cross and you may end up camping additional days. Trekking with assigned mountain guides is compulsory.

Photo credit : www.photomalaysia.com

Photo credit : www.photomalaysia.com

7. Gunung Korbu, Perak 2183m.
This mountain is usually ascended to summit together with Mount Gayong, the 4th highest peak in West Malaysia. The shortest climb is via Ulu Kinta Dam intake, where you will have to take a 4WD to Sg. Teming, an orang asli settlement. On Day1, the trek will take you to either camp at Seroja or Kijang. Day2 will be a full day trek to the summit where you will set up camp for the night. If you arrive early, you might just be in luck to view the stunning sunset, and weather permitting, you may even see Ipoh from here. Be warned that there is no water at the peak, and you will have to carry your ration at the last water point after Kijang. Mount Gayong is a good two-hour trek from the peak of Mount Korbu and from here it is a back-trek to the start, with camps at Seroja or Kijang before heading out to civilisation!


 8. Gunung Yong Belar, Pahang 2181m. 
This trek starts from scenic Cameron Highland. You will need to arrange for a 4WD to take you to Blue Valley, on a short but bumpy 1/2 hour ride. Upon reaching the intake, the start of the climb is a flight of steps about 250 in numbers. It may not look menacing at first sight, but when coming back - your body battered by 3 days of long hikes and your mind thinking of hot shower and a warm bed - climbing down may be quite treacherous. Go slow and look where you place your feet. For the most part of the first half of the trek on the first day, you'll need to tread gingerly on rubber water pipes that's been lain to transport water from the nearby rivers to the farms in Blue Valley. They cover the entire width of the path, leaving you without a choice but to walk on the pipes. A typical ascend to Yong Belar will take you to Kem Tudung Periuk, where you'll make camp on the first day. Day 2 will see a leisurely 3-hour hike with a day-pack to Kem Kasut. The water source is much nearer at this site than at Camp Tudung Periuk (literally 'pot cover'). From here, the trek to the peak takes less than an hour. You should be able to see Mount Korbu and Mount Gayong from the summit. After another night at base camp, it's a back-trek out to Blue Valley for you onward journey home. If you so desire, you can make a (one hour return) detour to Gunung Warpu on your trek out. There's not much of a scenery here, so only if you have some energy to spare!

Photo credit : my.geoview.info

Photo credit : weareoda.blogspot.com

9. Gunung Gayong, Perak 2173m.
This peak is normally done in tandem with G. Korbu. You will camp at the summit of Korbu, go for a day trek (about two hours, one-way) to Gayong, and then head back to base camp. 

10. Gunung Chamah, Kelantan 2171m.
Some insist that Mount.Chamah is in Perak, but if you want to be picky about it, then the safest statement would be that it is along the Perak/Kelantan border. The more adventurous climbers can actually opt to do a crossover starting from Mount Ulu Sepat and traversing the Titiwangsa Range to complete a double. However, logistics can be quite a nightmare and it would be safer to just attempt one peak at a time. The usual route would be to begin at Gua Musang, Kelantan. You can arrange for a 4WD at Kg Betis, a small village about 17km from town to take you to the orang asli settlement of Kg Rekom where the trailhead is located. The truck will use an old logging road and the ride can be quite bumpy. From Kg Rekom the first camp site is just about 1/2 an hour trek, but it would be advisable to venture further into the jungle to the 2nd camp known as Kem Tengah. Water supply is plentiful as it is just beside a beautiful fall. Another hour away is Kem Tongkat Ali, the last water point before the peak. Halfway between these 2 camps is a stream where the water is absolutely clear and you don't even need to boil or use purification tablets - just bring a straw and drink directly from the stream! I kid you not! The journey to the summit of Mount Chamah is a series of ups and downs, so save some energy for the return trek. At one of these false peaks, you will find plenty of pitcher plants of various colours and sizes, then through a bamboo grove and once you reach a 'mossy' forest, you are not far from your destination. The trek from Kem Tongkat Ali should take about 4-5 hours. The Chamah summit offers views of the surrounding mountains, including Ulu Sepat and Tahan too, if the skies are clear. It can easily take in about 6 2-men tents, if you wish to spend the night. But you have to bring enough water as there are no water source at the peak.

Photo credit : outdoorsmalaysia.blogspot.com

11. Gunung Yong Yap, Perak 2168m.
At 2168m, it is the 6th highest point in Peninsula Malaysia. The mountain is part of the Titiwangsa Range in Perak. There are two routes to ascend Mount Yong Yap. The tougher one is via Kuala Mu, near Sg. Siput, with fallen tree trunks, sharp-edged bamboos, thorny trees and branches. Climbers are advised to wear long pants because of the sharp-edged bamboos. Extremely steep and tough trails en-route to the summit, uneven and slippery trails make the whole journey tough and challenging, especially for those who are not experienced. The other easier route is via Pos Brooke, about 25km from Kg Raja in Cameron Highlands. Although considered 'easier', the challenge here is the multiple river crossings, close to 30 times some of which reach up to your thighs (higher if raining). Highly advisable to bring along a trekking pole for support while crossing, especially where the currents are strong. You will most likely make camp at Kem Agas on Day 1 of your trek. A river runs close to the site where you'll get your drinking and cooking supply and to wash up. On Day 2, more river crossings await you until you reach Kem Sg Y. From here, it's uphill to the peak of Yong Yap. The last one kilometer or so is a pretty steep incline of roots and progress here can be slowed down rather considerably.

12. Gunung Ulu Sepat, Kelantan 2160m.
 Even though Gunung Ulu Sepat is a mountain of great heights, climbing it just takes about three days. The start of the trail is at Kampong Rantau, which is the remote village in the Grik area of Perak, where the climb to Gunung Chamah also begins.


Anyone of you have visited one of the mountain before? Feel free to share with us your experiences and photos. We would like to know more about your kind of journey to the top.
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Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

How to get your valentine's heart?

As you are getting ready for coming Valentine's Day, you may consider making a special valentine's dessert for your loved one instead of giving a simple box of wrapper chocolates. You will certainly get the key to your loved one's heart by putting your time and hard work on making this delicious White Chocolate Raspberry Cheesecake.
Photo credit: sweetstreet.com

Ingredients 

  • 1 cup chocolate cookie crumbs
  • 3 tablespoons white sugar
  • 1/4 cup butter, melted
  • 3 tablespoons white sugar
  • 1 ( 10 ounce ) package frozen raspberries
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 cups white chocolate chips
  • 1/2 cup half-and-half cream
  • 3 ( 8 ounce ) packages cream cheese, softened
  • 1/2 cup white sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions
Prep Time: 30 minutes, Cook: 60 minutes, Ready in: 10 hours

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F ( 165 degrees C ). 
  2. In a medium bowl, mix together cookie crumbs, 3 tablespoons sugar, and melted butter. Press mixture into the bottom of the 9 inch spring form pan.
  3. In a saucepan, combine raspberries, 2 tablespoons sugar, cornstarch, and water. Bring to boil, and continue boiling for 5 minutes, or until sauce is thick. Strain sauce through a mesh strainer to remove seeds.
  4. In a metal bowl over a pan of simmering water, melt white chocolate chips with half-and-half, stirring occasionally until smooth.
  5. In a large bowl, mix together cream cheese and 1/2 cup sugar until smooth. Beat in eggs one at a time. Blend in vanilla and melted white chocolate. Pour half of batter over crust. Spoon 3 tablespoons raspberry sauce over batter. Pour remaining cheesecake batter into pan, and again spoon 3 tablespoons raspberry sauce over the top. Swirl batter with the tip of a knife to create a marbled effect.
  6. Bake for 55 to 60 minutes, or until filling is set. Cool, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for 8 hours before removing from pan. Serve with remaining raspberry sauce.

Don't forget to share with us if you have any other good for Valentine's day. ;​​​​​​​​​​​
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Monday, December 9, 2013

Monday, December 09, 2013

新年12生肖两两相对齐团聚

我们中国人(华人)的十二生肖两两相对,六道轮回,体现了我们祖先对我们中国人全部的期望及要求。我们先来看看十二生肖全家福,稍后再来稍微介绍这十二生肖的含义。

12 生肖全家福
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Sunday, October 20, 2013

Sunday, October 20, 2013

10 Amazing Benefits of Banana

Have you ever wonder what a banana can do for your health? You will never look at banana the same way again after discovering 10 facts about this fantastic fruit which benefits our health and making it a reason to add them in your diet.

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Energy - Bananas supply proper carbohydrates that our muscles need to replace the muscle glycogen (muscle sugar) used and they have the antioxidants that may help speed recovery.

They’re Diet-Friendly - A medium banana is 110 calories and provides 30 grams of carbs and 3 grams fiber. In addition to filling fiber, bananas contain resistant starch, a type of carbohydrate you can’t digest, but helps you feel fuller longer. A banana can have 2-3 grams of resistant starch (the greener it is, the more resistant starch it contains). This makes them a great mid-afternoon snack, or a perfect pre-workout snack if you eat them 1 hour before your workout.

Potassium - A banana has 422 mg potassium while being sodium-free. The high potassium:sodium ratio helps to neutralize the blood-pressure raising effects of sodium in your diet. Bananas help the body's circulatory system deliver oxygen to the brain, helping maintain regular heartbeat and proper water balance in your body. Adults need 4,700 milligrams of potassium a day, so a medium banana provides nearly 10 percent of the daily requirement.

Building Stronger Bone - Eating bananas helps prevent kidney cancer, protects the eyes against macular degeneration and builds strong bones by increasing calcium absorption.

PMS - Bananas contain 20 percent of the daily requirements of vitamin B6. Vitamin B6 helps the body make nonessential amino acids to create healthy cells. Vitamin B6 regulates blood glucose levels and helps us in times of stress and helps to suppress cranky moods. It also helps produce insulin, hemoglobin and antibodies that help fight infections.

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Increase Brain Power - Potassium-packed fruits helps learning because it makes the pupils more alert. Students find that they have more brain power and do better on exams when they eat bananas at breakfast and lunch.

Iron - Bananas are rich in iron too, and can help individuals with anemia. Iron rich foods, such as bananas help stimulate production of hemoglobin in the blood.

Help Smokers Quit - Bananas contain B-Vitamins and other minerals that lessen the effect of nicotine withdrawal both physically and psychologically.

Increase happiness - Bananas release a mood regulating substance called Tryptophan (one of the 22 standard amino acids and an essential amino acid in the human diet) which is converted to serotonin in the brain and thus boost mood and reduce feeling blue. Men and women need 420 mg and 320 mg of the mineral per day, respectively. Low levels of this mineral are linked to depression, anxiety, irritability and other mood disorders.

Bowel Health - Bananas are high in soluble fiber which helps stop constipation and helps to restore and maintain regular bowel function.
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Thursday, August 29, 2013

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Are you brave enough for Free Diving?

Ever tried to hold your breath for as long as you can? Most of us have. Well there's a sport that people hold their breath for a really long time and dive down to depths that most human never even approached before without any supports.

As we know, this sport is called Free Diving and it involves going down hundreds of feet into cold and dark waters by holding his or her breath until resurfacing rather than on the use of a breathing apparatus such as scuba gear. It's considered an extreme sport because it is very dangerous and might even cost your life. It's an experimental sport because it is revealing human capabilities which had never even been imagined. It's becoming more popular every year and many people are so interested to try it.

Free diving has been around for a very long time. It was how the ancient Greeks went down for sponges. Without so much as a snorkel, they'd dive to around 100 feet. Today's free divers go down a lot further for fun and sport. They want to join the sea world without disturbing it. No tanks, no bubbles, no noise.

And because of free diving, scientists now know that humans are closer to dolphins than had been thought. Just like dolphins, when we go into cold water a reflex kicks in which slows down our pulse; shifts blood from our extremities to our heart and to our brain. Our spleen contracts releasing oxygen rich blood into our arteries.

Is under the water a place humans belong? Free divers think so. They point out that the amniotic fluid in the womb where a fetus lives for nine months is very similar to seawater. That if a newborn is immediately submerged in a pool it will swim the breaststroke and be able to hold its breath for 40 seconds. It will retain this ability until it learns how to walk. But the human body has several adaptations under diving conditions, which stem from the mammalian diving reflex. These adaptations enable the human body to endure depth and lack of oxygen far beyond what would be possible without the reflex.


Here are some example of the training to be a free diver.
  • Equalizing Training - Your ears are the most likely physical reason to limit your depth. You can only go as deep as you can equalise your ears. 
  • Technique Training - Having a good technique will save you oxygen, give you better hydrodynamics, and make your dive more enjoyable. This is best practised on the surface in a pool and while doing dynamic apnea.
  • Breath Hold Training - You need to get “comfortable” holding your breath. This training can include maximums, Co2 tolerance and Hypoxic tolerance.
  • Relaxation Training - This will make your dive 100 times more enjoyable and save you lots of oxygen.
  • Lung Training - Slowly adapting your lungs to handle the depth and compression. This can be done with certain yoga exercises and FRC training in shallow pools.
  • Cardiovascular Training - Gives you a good cardiovascular ability (high Co2 max – oxygen uptake), strong heart and a low resting pulse.
  • High Intensity Cardio Training - Makes you able to tolerate high levels of lactic acid and making use of the anaerobic energy system.
  • Muscular Training - Gives you muscles at the right places, trained for what you want them to do and making your movements more energy efficient and relaxed.
  • Flexibility Training/Yoga - This Training will give you better knowledge of your body and make your muscles more relaxed. Flexibility will give you better technique and decrease the risk of squeeze.
  • Mental Training - Mental strength and self knowledge is imperative for freediving. Train meditation, visualisation and yoga.
Above are just the data we collected from the internet and it is just for references, if you wish to know more details about Free Diving, please look for the pros with license. Are you a free diver? Or do you have any experience in diving? Share with us.;​​​​​​​​​​​
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